DepEd Teacher 1 Demonstration Teaching

Demonstration teaching is done in different ways in different DepEd divisions. If there are many applicants, expect that your demo teaching will not last that long but it is still best to prepare.

9 GREAT TIPS HOW YOU CAN ACE YOUR DEMONSTRATION TEACHING

  1. Write a good demonstration lesson plan and practice to execute it very well.
  2. The Visual Aid must be interesting and appropriate to the topic.
  3. The use of Audio-Visual Material is highly recommended.
  4. Make sure you know your major very well. It is highly possible that you do an impromptu demo teaching in which the panel will ask what your field of specialization is and gives you the topic to discuss. You will only have a few minutes then to teach them the topic they have chosen for you. So be prepared.
  5. However, in some schools, especially those which are located in the city, you are most likely expected to use PowerPoint presentation and audio-visual materials. Being creative is the key.
  6. Think of some ways on how to be lively during your demo. Panels are easily impressed with those who can establish a connection to them so make sure you have an exciting motivation activity.
  7. Your good command of the language can also impress the panels.
  8. Less talk, less mistake. Always remember that if you are not sure of what to say, better answer shortly. There is no room for errors when you are facing the panels so, be very well-prepared!
  9. After the demo teaching, wait for the announcement of the schedule of the English Proficiency Test.

DepEd Teacher 1 Applicant Demonstration Teaching

DepEd Order No. 7, s. 2015 (Hiring Guidelines for Teacher I Positions)

DepEd Order No. 7, s. 2015 shall be the basis for the hiring policies for Kindergarten, Elementary and Junior High Levels while DepEd Order No. 3, s. 2016 for Senior High School teaching positions, from hereon until further notice.

Demonstration Teaching – 15 points

Applicants shall be evaluated according to the rubrics indicated on the following table.

A. Lesson Planning and PreparationTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Selecting Instructional ObjectivesTeacher's objectives reflect high level learning related to curriculum frameworks and standards; they are adapted, where necessary, to the needs of individual students, and permit practical/ workable methods of assessment. Teacher’s objectives represent valuable learning and are suitable for most students in the class; they reflect opportunities for integration and permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.Teacher's objectives are of moderate value or suitability for students in the class, consisting of a combination of objectives and activities, some of which permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.Teacher's objectives represent trivial learning, are unsuitable for students, or are stated only as instructional activities, and they do not permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.
2. Mapping Coherent InstructionAll of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives, engage students in meaningful learning, and show evidence of student input. Teacher's lesson or unit is highly coherent and has a clear structure.Most of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives and engage students in meaningful learning and the lesson or unit has a clearly defined structure.Some of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives and engage students in meaningful learning, while others do not. Teacher's lesson or unit has a recognizable structure.The various elements of the instructional design do not support the stated instructional objectives or engage students in meaningful learning and the lesson or unit has no defined structure.
3. Instructional Materials, Resources, and TechnologyAll materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and most engage students in meaningful learning.

There is evidence of student participation in selecting or adapting materials.
All materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and most engage student in meaningful learning. Technology used to enhance and support instruction.Some of the materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and some engage students in meaningful learning.Materials and resources do not support the instructional objectives and key concepts or engage students in meaningful learning.
B. Classroom ManagementTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Managing Classroom ProceduresClassroom routines and procedures are seamless in their operation, and students assume considerable responsibility for their smooth functioning.Classroom routines and procedures have been established and function smoothly for the most part, with little loss of instruction time.Classroom routines and procedures have been established, but function unevenly or inconsistently, with some loss of instruction time.Classroom routines and procedures are partly inefficient, resulting in the loss of much instructional time.
2. Organizing Physical SpaceTreacher's classroom is safe and students contribute to ensuring that the physical environment supports the learning cf all students.Teacher's classroom is safe and learning is accessible to all students; the teacher uses physical resources well and ensures that the physical arrangement supports the learning activities.Teacher's classroom is safe and essential learning accessible to all students but the future arrangement only partially supports the learning activities.Teacher makes poor use cf the physical environment resulting in unsafe or inaccessible conditions for some students. There is poor alignment between the physical arrangement and the lesson activities.
C. Teaching-Learning ProcessTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Knowledge of Content and PedagogyTeacher's knowledge cf content and pedagogy is extensive, showing evidence cf a continuing search for improved practice. Teacher actively builds on knowledge of prerequisites and misconceptions when describing instruction or seeking causes for student misunderstanding.Teacher demonstrates solid understanding of the content and its prerequisite relationships and connections with other disciplines. Teacher's instructional practices reflect current pedagogical knowledge.Teacher's content and pedagogical knowledge represents basic understanding but does not extend to connections with other disciplines or to possible student misconceptions.Teacher displays little understanding of the subject or structure of the discipline, or of content-related pedagogy.
2. Questioning and Discussion SkillsTeacher formulates many of the high-level questions and assumes responsibility for the participation of all students in the discussion.Teacher's use of questioning and discussion techniques reflects high-level questions, true discussion, and full participation by all students.Teacher's use of questioning and discussion techniques is uneven, with some high-level questions, attempts at true discussion, and moderate studentTeacher makes poor use of questioning and discussion techniques, with low-level questions, limited student participation, and little true discussion.
3. Students LearningStudents are intellectually engaged in challenging content, through well-designed learning tasks, and suitable scaffolding by the teacher, and fully aligned with the instructional outcomes. There is evidence of some student initiation of inquiry, and student contributions to the exploration of important content. The pacing of the lesson provides students the time needed to intellectually engage with and reflect upon their learning and to consolidate their understanding,The learning tasks and activities are aligned with the instructional outcomes and are designed to challenge student thinking, resulting in active intellectual engagement by most students with important and challenging content, and with teacher scaffolding to support that engagement. The pacing of the lesson is appropriate, providing most students the time needed to be intellectually engaged.The learning tasks or prompts are partially aligned with the instructional outcomes but require only minimal thinking by students, allowing most students to be passive or merely compliant. The pacing of the lesson may not provide students the time needed to be intellectually engaged.The learning tasks and activities, materials, resources, instructional groups and/or technology are poorly aligned with the instructional outcomes, or require only rote responses. The pace of the lesson is too slow or rushed. Few students are intellectually engaged or interested.
4. Students' Response to ActivitiesAll students are cognitively engaged in the activities and in their exploration of content. Students initiate or adapt activities and projects to enhance understanding.Most activities are appropriate to students. Almost all students are cognitively engaged in them.Some activities are appropriate to students and engage them cognitively but others do not.Activities are inappropriate for students in terms cf their age or backgrounds. Students are not engaged mentally.
5. Learning ActivitiesLearning activities are highly relevant to students and instructional objectives and key concepts. They progress coherently, producing a unified whole and reflecting recent professional research.Most of the learning activities are suitable to students and instructional objectives and key concepts. Progression of activities in the unit is fairly even, and most activities reflect recent professional research.Only some of the learning activities are suitable to students or instructional objectives and key concepts. Progression of activities in the unit is uneven, and only some activities reflect recent professional research.Learning activities are not suitable to students or instructional objectives and key concepts. They do not follow an organized progression and do not reflect recent professional research.
D. Language ProficiencyTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Use of languageTeacher's spoken and written language is correct and expressive, with well-chosen vocabulary that enriches the lesson.Teacher's spoken and written language is clear and correct. Vocabulary is appropriate to students' age and interests.Teacher's spoken language is audible, and written language is legible. Both are used correctly. Vocabulary is correct but limited or is not appropriate to students' ages or backgrounds.Teacher's spoken language is inaudible, or written language is illegible.

Spoken or written language may contain many grammar and syntax errors: vocabulary may be inappropriate, vague, or used incorrectly, leaving students confused.
2. Conveyance of Information and IdeasConveys information and ideas with clarity.Conveys information and ideas with considerable clarity.Conveys information and ideas with limited clarity.Presents orally using correct intonation and body language to clarify a message.
E. Assessment of Learning outcomesTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Congruence with Instructional ObjectivesThe assessment is completely congruent with the instructional objectives and key concepts, both in content and process.All the instructional objectives and key concepts are assessed through the proposed plan, but the approach is more suitable to some goals than to others.Some of the instructional objectives and key concepts are assessed through the proposed approach, but many are not.Content and methods of assessment lack congruence with instructional objectives and key concepts.
2. Assessing Student LearningTeacher's plan for student assessment is fully aligned with the instructional outcomes, with clear criteria and standards that show evidence of student contribution to their development.Teacher's plan for student assessment is aligned with the instructional outcomes, using clear criteria, is appropriate to the needs of students. Teacher intends to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for groups of students.Teacher's plan for student assessment is partially aligned with the instructional outcomes, without clear criteria, and inappropriate for at least some students. Teacher intends to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for the class asa whole.Teacher's approach to assessing student learning contains no clear criteria or standards, and lacks congruence with the instructional objectives.

The results of assessment have minimal impact on the design of future instruction.
F. Reinforcement of LearningTransforming
4 points
Developing
3 points
Emerging
2 points
Beginning
1 point
1. Providing Opportunities to Strengthen KPUPThe teacher integrated and carried out the plan for reinforcing learning through well-defined agreement and established connection to next lesson.The teacher integrated and carried out the plan for reinforcing learning through well-defined task as an agreement and but unable to establish connection to the next lesson.The teacher integrated agreement in the plan without traces of reinforcing learning and connecting it to the next lesson.The teacher failed to integrate and carry out the provision for reinforcing learning of the lesson taught.

The number of points attained for each of the fifteen (15)listed components shall be added and then divided by sixty (60). The quotient shall then be multiplied by 0.15 or 15%. The product shall then be multiplied by 100.

Example:

Sum of points attained for the 15 components = 45

[(45 / 60)x0.15] x 100 = 11.25

Score for Demonstration Teaching = 11.25 / 15

Applicants for K to 3 who will perform Demonstration Teaching using the mother tongue cf the locality where the school being applied for is located shall be given an additional +5 points on top of the score they have obtained.

For applicants who may be assigned in a school located in an IP community and/or serving IP learners, the Division Selection Committee shall give due recognition to an applicant’s knowledge and skill in integrating indigenous knowledge, culture, and skills into the teaching-learning process (as demonstrated in the above aspects).

Applicants shall undergo Demonstration Teaching designed specifically for the teaching positions they are applying for.

CONTINUE READING: 2019 DepEd Teacher 1 Hiring Guidelines

DepEd Order No. 3, s. 2016 (Hiring Guidelines for Senior High School (SHS) Teaching Positions)

Demonstration Teaching – 20 points for ACADEMIC and CORE SUBJECTS; 15 points for TVL, ARTS and DESIGN, SPORTS track subjects

Applicants shall be evaluated according to the rubrics indicated on pages 16 to 21.

A. Lesson Planning and Preparation4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Selecting Instructional ObjectivesTeacher's objectives reflect high level learning related to curriculum frameworks and standards; they are adapted, where necessary, to the needs of individual students, and permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.Teacher's objectives represent valuable learning and are suitable for most students in the class; they reflect opportunities for integration and permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.Teacher's objectives are of moderate value or suitability for students in the class, consisting of a combination of objectives and activities, some of which permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.Teacher's objectives represent trivial learning, are unsuitable for students, or are stated only as instructional activities, and they do not permit practical/ workable methods of assessment.
2. Mapping Coherent InstructionAll of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives, engage students in meaningful learning, and show evidence of student input. Teacher's lesson or unit is highly coherent and has a clear structure.Most of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives and engage students in meaningful learning and the lesson or unit has a clearly defined structure.Some of the elements of the instructional design support the stated instructional objectives and engage students in meaningful learning, while others do not. Teacher's lesson or unit has a recognizable structure.The various elements of the instructional design do not support the stated instructional objectives or engage students in meaningful learning and the lesson or unit has no defined structure.
3. Instructional Materials, Resources, and TechnologyAll materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and most engage students in meaningful learning. There is evidence of student participation in selecting or adapting materials.All materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and most engage student in meaningful learning. Technology used to enhance and support instruction.Some of the materials and resources support the instructional objectives and key concepts, and some engage students in meaningful learning.Materials and resources do not support the instructional objectives and key concepts or engage students in meaningful learning.
B. Classroom Management4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Managing Classroom ProceduresClassroom routines and procedures are seamless in their operation, and students assume considerable responsibility for their smooth functioning.Classroom routines and procedures have been established and function smoothly for the most part, with little loss of instruction time.Classroom routines and procedures have been established, but function unevenly or inconsistently, with some loss of instruction time.Classroom routines and procedures are partly inefficient, resulting in the loss of much instructional time.
2. Organizing Physical SpaceTeacher's classroom is safe and students contribute to ensuring that the physical environment supports the learning of all students.Teacher's classroom is safe and learning is accessible to all students; the teacher uses physical resources well and ensures that the physical arrangement supports the learning activities.Teacher's classroom is safe and essential learning accessible to all students but the future arrangement only partially supports the learning activities.Teacher makes poor use of the physical environment resulting in unsafe or inaccessible conditions for some students. There is poor alignment between the physical arrangement and the lesson activities.
C. Teaching-Learning Process4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Knowledge of Content and PedagogyTeacher's knowledge of content and pedagogy is extensive, showing evidence of a continuing search for improved practice. Teacher actively builds on knowledge of prerequisites and misconceptions when describing instruction or seeking causes for student misunderstanding.Teacher demonstrates solid understanding of the content and its prerequisite relationships and connections with other disciplines. Teacher's instructional practices reflect current pedagogical knowledge.Teacher's content and pedagogical knowledge represents basic understanding but does not extend to connections with other disciplines or to possible student misconceptions.Teacher displays little understanding of the subject or structure of the discipline, or of content-related pedagogy.
2. Questioning and Discussion SkillsTeacher formulates many of the high-level questions and assumes responsibility for the participation of all students in the discussion.Teacher's use of questioning and discussion techniques reflects high-level questions, true discussion, and full participation by all students.Teacher's use of questioning and discussion techniques is uneven, with some high-level questions, attempts at true discussion, and moderate student participation.Teacher makes poor use of questioning and discussion techniques, with low-level questions, limited student participation, and little true discussion.
3. Students' LearningStudents are intellectually engaged in challenging content, through well-designed learning tasks, and suitable scaffolding by the teacher, and fully aligned with the instructional outcomes. There is evidence of some student initiation of inquiry, and student contributions to the exploration of important content. The pacing of the lesson provides students the time needed to intellectually engage with and reflect upon their learning and to consolidate their understanding.The learning tasks and activities are aligned with the instructional outcomes and are designed to challenge student thinking, resulting in active intellectual engagement by most students with important and challenging content, and with teacher scaffolding to support that engagement. The pacing of the lesson is appropriate, providing most students the time needed to be intellectually engaged.The learning tasks or prompts are partially aligned with the instructional outcomes but require only minimal thinking by students, allowing most students to be passive or merely compliant. The pacing of the lesson may not provide students the time needed to be intellectually engaged.The learning tasks and activities, materials, resources, instructional groups and/or technology are poorly aligned with the instructional outcomes, or require only rote responses. The pace of the lesson is too slow or rushed. Few students are intellectually engaged or interested.
4. Students' Response to ActivitiesAll students are cognitively engaged in the activities and in their exploration of content. Students initiate or adapt activities and projects to enhance understanding.Most activities are appropriate to students. Almost all students are cognitively engaged in them.Some activities are appropriate to students and engage them cognitively but others do not.Activities are inappropriate for students in terms of their age or backgrounds. Students are not engaged mentally.
5. Learning ActivitiesLearning activities are highly relevant to students and instructional objectives and key concepts. They progress coherently, producing a unified whole and reflecting recent professional research.Most of the learning activities are suitable to students and instructional objectives and key concepts. Progression of activities in the unit is fairly even, and most activities reflect recent professional research.Only some of the learning activities are suitable to students or instructional objectives and key concepts. Progression of activities in the unit is uneven, and only some activities reflect recent professional research.Learning activities are not suitable to students or instructional objectives and key concepts. They do not follow an organized progression and do not reflect recent professional research.
D. Language Proficiency4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Use of languageTeacher's spoken and written language is correct and expressive, with well-chosen vocabulary that enriches the lesson.Teacher's spoken and written language is clear and correct. Vocabulary is appropriate to students' age and interests.Teacher's spoken language is audible, and written language is legible. Both are used correctly. Vocabulary is correct but limited or is not appropriate to students' ages or backgrounds.Teacher's spoken language is inaudible, or written language is illegible.

Spoken or written language may contain many grammar and syntax errors: vocabulary may be inappropriate, vague, or used incorrectly, leaving students confused.
2. Conveyance of Information and IdeasConveys information and ideas with clarity.Conveys information and ideas with considerable clarity.Conveys information and ideas with limited clarity.Presents orally using correct intonation and body language to clarify a message.
E. Assessment of Learning Outcomes4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Congruence with Instructional ObjectivesThe assessment is completely congruent with the instructional objectives and key concepts, both in content and process.All the instructional objectives and key concepts are assessed through the proposed plan, but the approach is more suitable to some goals than to others.Some of the instructional objectives and key concepts are assessed through the proposed approach, but many are not.Content and methods of assessment lack congruence with instructional objectives and key concepts.
2. Assessing Student LearningTeacher's plan for student assessment is fully aligned with the instructional outcomes, with clear criteria and standards that show evidence of student contribution to their development.Teacher's plan for student assessment is aligned with the instructional outcomes, using clear criteria, is appropriate to the needs of students. Teacher intends to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for groups of students.Teacher's plan for student assessment is partially aligned with the instructional outcomes, without clear criteria, and inappropriate for at least some students. Teacher intends to use assessment results to plan for future instruction for the class as a whole.Teacher's approach to assessing student learning contains no clear criteria or standards, and lacks congruence with the instructional objectives.

The results of assessment have minimal impact on the design of future instruction.
F. Reinforcement of Learning4 points3 points2 points1 point
1. Providing Opportunities to Strengthen Students' Written Work, Performance Tasks, and Quarterly AssessmentThe teacher integrated and carried out the plan for reinforcing learning through well-defined agreement and established connection to next lesson.The teacher integrated and carried out the plan for reinforcing learning through well-defined task as an agreement and but unable to establish connection to the next lesson.The teacher integrated agreement in the plan without traces of reinforcing learning and connecting it to the next lesson.The teacher failed to integrate and carry out the provision for reinforcing learning of the lesson taught.

The number of points attained for each of the fifteen (15) listed components shall be added and then divided by sixty (60). The quotient shall then be multiplied by 0.20 (or 20% for Academic track and core subject applicants) or by 0.15 (or 15% for TVL, Arts and Design, and Sports tracks applicants). The product shall then be multiplied by 100.

Example:

Sum of points attained for the 15 components by Arts and Design applicant = 45

[(45 / 60) x 0.15] x 100 = 11.25

Score for Demonstration Teaching = 11.25 / 15

Applicants shall undergo Demonstration Teaching specifically for subject/s under the SHS subject group for which they are applying.

CONTINUE READING: 2019 DepEd Hiring Guidelines for Senior High School (SHS) Teachers

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2 thoughts on “DepEd Teacher 1 Demonstration Teaching”

  1. Hi, I applied for a teaching position in a nearby school, I wasn’t able to meet the principal for he was engaged in a meeting but I left the requirements on his table. After a few days, I took an EPT exam. ask ko lang po doon sa tip #9

    Nauna po yung EPT exam kesa sa demo. Ano po ba ang dapat kong I-expect? Thank you so much.

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